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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

attitudes

A person's belief that his/her repeated experience has shown that buying from a certain company is better than buying from others is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items. The scale was called conative loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the extent to which a person likes a certain company along with its features, services, and offerings. The scale was called affective loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's belief that buying from a certain company is preferable to buying from others. The scale was called cognitive loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.

The degree to which a person attributes success to his/her own efforts versus fate or other forces is measured in this scale with ten forced-choice items. The Valecha (1972) version of the scale asks respondents not only to choose between items in each pair but also to indicate how close the choice is to their own true opinions.

The scale is composed of eleven statements attempting to measure a person's reason for using/not using some information bearing on health risks. To the extent that a person uses the information then it indicates external locus of control whereas expressing non-usage of the information suggests internal control. The response format used by Keller, Lipkus, and Rimer (2002) was simply yes/no.

The scale is composed of three statements measuring the extent to which a person believes a decision that has been made makes sense and is easy to support.

The personal relevance of a product and a consumer's interest in the product is measured in this scale with three, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of three Likert-type statements assessing how upset a consumer says he/she would be if it turned out that a poor brand decision was made. This scale appears to relate to the consequences component of risk and, in particular, to the type of consequence called a psychological loss (e.g., Cox 1967).

The scale has three Likert-type statements that are used to assess the extent to which a consumer expresses interest in a certain brand.

The scale has three Likert-type statements that measure a consumer's level of interest in a product category and the stores that carry it, particularly the stores specializing in that product category.