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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

attitudes

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's belief that buying from a certain company is preferable to buying from others. The scale was called cognitive loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.

A person's belief that his/her repeated experience has shown that buying from a certain company is better than buying from others is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items. The scale was called conative loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the extent to which a person likes a certain company along with its features, services, and offerings. The scale was called affective loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.

The scale is composed of eleven statements attempting to measure a person's reason for using/not using some information bearing on health risks. To the extent that a person uses the information then it indicates external locus of control whereas expressing non-usage of the information suggests internal control. The response format used by Keller, Lipkus, and Rimer (2002) was simply yes/no.

The degree to which a person attributes success to his/her own efforts versus fate or other forces is measured in this scale with ten forced-choice items. The Valecha (1972) version of the scale asks respondents not only to choose between items in each pair but also to indicate how close the choice is to their own true opinions.

The scale is composed of three statements measuring the extent to which a person believes a decision that has been made makes sense and is easy to support.

The scale is composed of four Likert-type statements assessing the degree of difficulty a consumer has in selecting a brand from among the alternative brands in a certain product category. This scale appears to relate to the uncertainty component of risk (e.g., Bauer 1960). Voss, Spangenberg, and Grohmann (2003) referred to this scale as the mispurchase dimension of the CIP (see Origin below).

Three Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent that a consumer expresses pleasure in buying and owning a brand. The scale was labeled as the Hedonic dimension of the CIP (see Origin below) by Voss, Spangenberg, and Grohmann (2003).

The six item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure the importance of politics to the respondent and its centrality in his/her life.

The personal relevance of a product and a consumer's interest in the product is measured in this scale with three, five-point Likert-type items.