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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
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Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

attitudes

The six item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure the importance of politics to the respondent and its centrality in his/her life.

This semantic differential scale measures the temporary (rather than enduring and/or intrinsic) relevance of an object to a person. Whereas enduring involvement is ongoing and is probably related to a product class, situational involvement is a passing motivation. The scale can be easily customized for measuring involvement with such things a particular ad a person has been exposed to or the amount of involvement in a certain purchase decision.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's attitude regarding the extent of control he/she had over a particular Internet-related task. The scale was called decisional control by Mathwick and Rigdon (2004).

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person uses the Internet because of the enjoyment received from it and its usefulness in having a good time.

The three-item, seven-point scale measures the extent to which a person thinks that Internet stores are easier to shop at and save more time compared to shopping at traditional retail stores. The scale is attempting to tap into a general attitude, not specific to any particular website or store.

A person's reasons for using the Internet, with an emphasis on its usefulness in learning information, is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type statements.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type statements and measures a person's reasons for using the Internet with an emphasis on the ease with which it can be used.

The three-item semantic differential scale measures the degree of importance a specified product characteristic has to a consumer in a choice context. Sujan and Bettman (1989) used it for attributes of 35mm SLR cameras while Desai and Keller (2002) applied it to the scent attribute of laundry detergents.

This three item scale is intended to measure the extent to which a person imagines that an object connects him/her to another time/place.

The scale is composed of three, ten-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the strength of the relationship a consumer has with a brand.