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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

attitudes

The scale is composed of three statements attempting to assess a consumer's belief of how well a brand can achieve a certain goal. The scale was called goodness-of-fit by Martin and Stewart (2001; Martin, Stewart, and Matta 2005).

The scale is composed of three Likert-type statements that measure the strength with which a person identifies with a certain role they either play or might play.

The scale is composed of three, ten-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the strength of the relationship a consumer has with a brand.

Three, five-point items are used to measure a consumer's belief of how well a brand or product category is thought to achieve certain goals. The scale was called ideals at the category level by Martin and Stewart (2001) and ideal attributes by Martin, Stewart, and Matta (2005).

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person views a product in general terms because of difficulty in understanding or knowing its specific characteristics.

The four item, nine-point scale attempts to assess a consumer's perception of the justness or equitability of a certain price for a certain product.

The three item scale assesses the degree to which a person views somebody or something as having made mistakes. The scale was called transgression index by Aaker, Fournier, and Brasel (2004) and used with reference to a fictitious company.

Three, four-point statements are used to assess the degree to which a consumer views the managers at a specified company as acting appropriately if/when factory closings are being considered. As used in the study by Klein, Smith, and John (2004), the items appear to be scored such that high scores suggest a person believes it would be flagrantly offensive to close factories unnecessarily.

The seven point semantic differential scale measures the degree to which a person's evaluation of the propriety of some stimulus is based upon beliefs shaped early in life by sources such as the family.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure a person's attitude regarding the effort required to learn and use something. Nysveen, Pederson and Thorbjørnsen (2005) used the scale with mobile services but it appears to be amenable for use with goods as well.