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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

attraction

The degree to which a person expresses liking of and attachment to another person is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person likes another person and would like to interact with him/her more is measured with eight, ten-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person expresses a willingness to be friendly and develop a relationship with a particular person is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Eight, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s desire to establish a relationship and communicate with a particular person on Twitter.  The scale may make most sense to use when the specified person is a celebrity.

The degree to which a customer of a business views the relationship "romantically" and reports intense feelings of attraction and desire is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items. Although developed and tested for use with businesses, the items appear to be amenable for use with a variety of organizations, e.g., churches, libraries, museums.

The scale is composed of three statements that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that being associated with a certain group would be either positive or negative. To the extent that a person believes the association would be very positive then the group can be called an aspirational group. At the other extreme, if a group would not be desirable to identify with then it is referred to as a dissociative group.