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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

attractiveness

The degree to which a person views an object as attractive and colorful is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is most appropriate for use with foods but might be used with other objects as well.

Six, seven-point semantic-differentials are employed in this scale to measure how beautiful and appealing something is believed to be.  The scale is general in the sense that it appears to be amenable for use with a wide variety of objects such as people, architecture, and art.

The degree to which a person views a food as being visible, desirable, and easy to access at a particular point in time is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three semantic differentials and an 11-point response format, this scale measures a person's attitude about how unpleasant something is.  While the scale could be used in contexts in which the focal object is likely to be viewed as positive, its creators (Smith, Faro, and Burson 2013) used the scale with respect to people and animals experiencing some sort of suffering.

A personality-type factor having to do with femininity and glamor traits is measured in this scale using three, seven-point unipolar items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the importance a shopper places on the design of an online store being innovative and visually appealing.

The perceived attractiveness and appeal of an object is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The degree to which a person believes that the interior of a certain brand's stores are pleasant and organized well is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is most suited for a chain of stores that is known for featuring its own branded products, e.g., Gap, Abercrombie & Fitch, Hollister.

The degree to which a person believes that a brand's products are modern and visually appealing is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that the outside of a certain physical space (such as a store) is unattractive.