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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

autonomy

With four, five-point items, the scale measures an adolescent’s belief that his/her parents would care about he/she thought if they said some media content is unsuitable for children, e.g., there is too much violence in movies and video games.

With ten Likert items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that his/her parent(s) made few demands on the kids while they were growing up and allowed them to regulate their own activities.

The degree to which a person believes that a particular individual has the right to make his/her own purchase choices is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale is intended to measure a person’s motivation to be in control of people and decisions.

The scale uses six statements to assess how much a person believes someone or something is true to itself and does not follow social conventions.  As written, the items are best suited for describing others but with minor editing, the scale could be used to describe the respondent's perceived level of autonomy.

Six, five-point Likert-type items measure a person’s belief that societal rules and norms are overly restrictive and limit person freedom too much.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer feels a certain product enables him/her to express self, with an emphasis on the freedom in choosing it.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person's belief in being able to personally solve a problem that would otherwise require the company's help to fix.  The scale items seem to be amenable for use with a variety of problems a customer might experience, e.g., with self-service technology, with a product, with a website. 

One's feeling that someone (unnamed) was trying to influence his/her evaluation in a particular situation is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, it is not just that the person feels that there was an attempt to influence him/her but that there was pressure to give a certain evaluation.

The degree to which a person rebuffs attempts at being persuaded, with an emphasis on recent efforts, is measured in this scale using four, seven-point Likert-type items.