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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

banks

Four, seven-point, semantic differentials measure how honest and legitimate something is believed to be.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s stated likelihood of challenging an action taken by an organization that he/she disputes and even escalating the issue if necessary.

This three item, 100-point Likert-type scale measures a person’s belief that a particular bank would be a excellent institution in which to put money.  The sentences are phrased hypothetically such that the scale makes most sense when the person is aware of the bank but is not a customer.

The significance that a customer places on the relationship he/she has with a particular business is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  As phrased, the items are most amenable for use with customers who receive ongoing services from a company.

The three, seven-point semantic differentials composing this scale measure how well a person believes two things are consistent and coordinated with each other.

How well a person believes two things are compatible and consistent with each other is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Five, seven-point semantic differentials compose this scale which measures a person's attitude about opening an account, especially if the business is offering a special incentive.

The scale measures a person's attitude about programs that combine multiple debt repayment obligations into one loan. 

The importance of issues other than interest rates in a person's decision to get a debt consolidation loan is measured in the scale with four, five-point Likert-like items.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses the desire and expectation to continue being a customer of a bank for the next few years. The scale was called behavioral intentions by Van Birgelen, de Jong, and Ruyter (2006)