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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

banks

Four, seven-point, semantic differentials measure how honest and legitimate something is believed to be.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s stated likelihood of challenging an action taken by an organization that he/she disputes and even escalating the issue if necessary.

This three item, 100-point Likert-type scale measures a person’s belief that a particular bank would be a excellent institution in which to put money.  The sentences are phrased hypothetically such that the scale makes most sense when the person is aware of the bank but is not a customer.

The significance that a customer places on the relationship he/she has with a particular business is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  As phrased, the items are most amenable for use with customers who receive ongoing services from a company.

The three, seven-point semantic differentials composing this scale measure how well a person believes two things are consistent and coordinated with each other.

How well a person believes two things are compatible and consistent with each other is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Five, seven-point semantic differentials compose this scale which measures a person's attitude about opening an account, especially if the business is offering a special incentive.

The scale measures a person's attitude about programs that combine multiple debt repayment obligations into one loan. 

The importance of issues other than interest rates in a person's decision to get a debt consolidation loan is measured in the scale with four, five-point Likert-like items.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses the desire and expectation to continue being a customer of a bank for the next few years. The scale was called behavioral intentions by Van Birgelen, de Jong, and Ruyter (2006)