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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

behavioral

A person's tendency to learn about and adopt innovations (new products) within a specific domain of interest is measured with six, five-point Likert-type items.  The scale is intended to be distinct from a generalized personality trait at one extreme and a highly specific, single product purchase at the other extreme.

Using four, nine-point items, the scale measures a person’s intention to engage in behaviors related to using sunscreen.

With three, seven-point items, this scale measures a consumer’s expressed probability of providing ideas and feedback to a particular business entity in the future.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure how much effort a person put into a particular task as well as how relevant it was.

Five, seven-point items measure how much cognitive effort a person put into reading some information.  

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s intention to say good things about a resort and encourage friends to go there.

The scale uses eight, five-point items to measure a person’s reasons for using the Internet which have to do with boredom, relaxation, and communicating with others.

Using 13 Likert-type items and a 101-point response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person reports having one-way affiliation behavior and desires with a media celebrity. 

The degree to which a person is willing to make sacrifices for the long-term good of society as well as for other causes of personal importance is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items were used to measure how much a person notices and values the effort expended by a person or company to produce an object.  To be clear, the scale measures a general attitude about things that are made rather than being specific to a particular producer or product.