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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

behavioral

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood a consumer will avoid buying products that contain a specific chemical and, instead, will purchase a particular brand that does not have the chemical.

A person's tendency to learn about and adopt innovations (new products) within a specific domain of interest is measured with six, five-point Likert-type items.  The scale is intended to be distinct from a generalized personality trait at one extreme and a highly specific, single product purchase at the other extreme.

The degree to which a person states that he/she is likely to consume alcohol in the next year is measured with three, five-point items.

This scale uses five, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief in his/her ability to operate manual and automatic transmission automobiles.  (Two items refer to driving a manual transmission vehicle while the other three items are relevant for either type.)

Nine, four-point items are used to measure how much a person engages in self-examination and introspection.

The motivation a person has to feel talented and able to perform well is measured with four, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s stated likelihood of buying a brand due to its sponsorship of something such as event or cause.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes the way an event is sponsored will increase his/her interest in the event and the likelihood of attending it.

The extent to which a person wants to make things with his/her hands is measured in this scale with seven, seven-point items.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure how much a business organization is believed to help others with their welfare as the goal rather than for the benefits the company can receive in return.