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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

behavioral

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person was trying to provide useful information to readers when choosing what to say in a review.  The object of the review is not stated in the scale items.  Given that, the scale is flexible for use with a wide variety of things that could be reviewed, e.g., products, companies, charities, political candidates.

Nine items are used to measure how much a person engages in eating-related behaviors meant to control one’s weight.

A person’s intentions to not only complain directly to the company but also to news media and multiple levels of government is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that drinking alcohol in excess is not a behavior in which he/she desires to engage.

Three, eleven point Likert-type items are used to measure the importance a person placed on winning a particular auction he/she was involved in with other bidders.

With six, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the apparent regulatory orientation of a charitable organization, ranging from a promotion focus to a prevention focus.

A consumer’s attitude about trying and buying products of a company the next time they are needed is measured with three statements.

Using three items, the scale measures a customer’s positive attitude toward purchasing items in a store and shopping there again in the future.  Because the items are stated hypothetically and are indefinite about when the shopping would occur, the scale might more precisely be measuring willingness to shop or attitude toward the act of shopping than strictly shopping intention.

With four, five-point Likert-type statements, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that other consumers come to him/her for product-related advice and are positively influenced by it. Since two of the items include the word “new” it also suggests that this scale taps into a facet of innovativeness as well as the person’s general ability to influence product-related opinions and behaviors.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s openness to the idea of purchasing a product by a company as a gift in a hypothetical situation.  The product, the company, and for whom the gift is intended are not specified in the items themselves and must be provided elsewhere.