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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

behavioral

A person’s plan to engage in behaviors that might help prevent him-/herself from experiencing heart disease is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale employs five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s plan to engage in certain behaviors in order to prevent skin cancer, with an emphasis on using suncreen.

A person’s expressed likelihood of engaging in behaviors that involve prevention or treatment of a health condition is measured with four, seven-point questions.  The particular health condition is not stated in the questions and should be provided in the instructions or the context of the study.

A person’s admission of deserving punishment and desire to punish one’s self is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Five, five-point items are used in this scale to measure how much a consumer considers trade-offs between his/her shopping goals given resource constraints and opportunity costs.

A consumer’s tendency to go shopping only when something is needed and buy just what is needed is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s enjoyment of shopping for a variety of related reasons (adventure, novelty, curiosity) is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.

Seven, seven-point items are used to measure how much a consumer engaged in spending behaviors during a trip such as impulse buying and poor decision-making due to insufficient planning and not sticking to a budget.

The degree to which a person reports having to force him/herself to continue engaging in an arithmetically-intensive task is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s willingness to encourage others to attend the games of a particular sports team.