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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

behavioral

A consumer’s stated probability of buying a particular product on a shopping trip in the next month is measured with three, seven-point items.  What makes this scale different from other measures of purchase likelihood is that this one refers to a specific time period and assumes the shopper has read some information on the package.

The scale has three, nine-point items that measure a person’s stated likelihood of sharing good information about a brand to others he/she knows.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point questions that measure the level of motivation a person has towards accomplishing a particular goal in a programmed plan of effort.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a consumer will regularly wear sunscreen in the future as well as recommend that others do so too.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood a consumer will avoid buying products that contain a specific chemical and, instead, will purchase a particular brand that does not have the chemical.

The degree to which a consumer not only believes that an object or experience is a good topic of conversation but also desires to talk to others about it is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s usage of two media at the same time to perform one or more tasks.  To be clear, the scale focuses on what a person did in a particular situation rather than his/her tendency over time to multi-task.

A customer’s enjoyment of talking in various media about a particular brand is measured using four, five-point Likert-type items.

With four, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer provides feedback to a company about his/her experiences brand’s products in order to help improve them or have new ones created.  The implication in the sentences is that this behavior is ongoing rather than a one-time event.

The degree to which a customer promotes and refers a brand to friends and relatives because of monetary incentives from the company is measured with four, five-point Likert-type items.