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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

behavioral

A person’s chronic motivation to critically evaluate alternatives in order to improve the quality of decisions that are made is measured with twelve, six-point Likert-type items.

The scale has twelve, six-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s chronic motivation to make progress towards achieving a goal in a direct manner without deviation and distraction.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the integration of social media usage into a person’s lifestyle, particularly as it pertains to following companies and brands.

The degree to which a person thinks about the meaning of a story is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a consumer habitually uses a particular product or brand for a purpose without consciously thinking about its choice is measured using four, five-point Likert-type items.  Four versions of the scale are described, varying based on which product and type of usage is being referred to: a product used regularly, a product that was replaced by another product that was used regularly, a product used rarely or not at all, and a product which was replaced by another product that ended up not being used much if at all.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s stated likelihood of challenging an action taken by an organization that he/she disputes and even escalating the issue if necessary.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person still wants to eat a familiar brand of a product immediately after having tried some of an unknown brand. 

The scale measures a consumer’s belief that if he/she was wronged in some way by a brand and/or some employees associated with it then the memories of the unfair behavior would be an obsession.  Six, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Five, six-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person describes his/her faith (unspecified) as providing meaning to life and affecting aspects of how he/she lives. 

Three, nine-point Likert-type items measure a person’s stated likelihood of buying a particular product/brand from a particular retailer if he/she was in the market for the product.