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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

behavioral

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s intention to say good things about a resort and encourage friends to go there. It appears the scale is easily adaptable for other places that involve lodging.

The scale uses eight, five-point items to measure a person’s reasons for using the Internet which have to do with boredom, relaxation, and communicating with others.

Using 13 Likert-type items and a 101-point response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person reports having one-way affiliation behavior and desires with a media celebrity. 

The degree to which a person is willing to make sacrifices for the long-term good of society as well as for other causes of personal importance is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items were used to measure how much a person notices and values the effort expended by a person or company to produce an object.  To be clear, the scale measures a general attitude about things that are made rather than being specific to a particular producer or product.

A person’s chronic motivation to critically evaluate alternatives in order to improve the quality of decisions that are made is measured with twelve, six-point Likert-type items.

The scale has twelve, six-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s chronic motivation to make progress towards achieving a goal in a direct manner without deviation and distraction.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the integration of social media usage into a person’s lifestyle, particularly as it pertains to following companies and brands.

The degree to which a person thinks about the meaning of a story is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a consumer habitually uses a particular product or brand for a purpose without consciously thinking about its choice is measured using four, five-point Likert-type items.  Four versions of the scale are described, varying based on which product and type of usage is being referred to: a product used regularly, a product that was replaced by another product that was used regularly, a product used rarely or not at all, and a product which was replaced by another product that ended up not being used much if at all.