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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

behavioral

Nine items are used to measure the tendency to accept one’s thoughts and feelings as they occur without evaluation or self-criticism.

A person’s tendency to express and verbalize his/her thoughts and feelings is measured with eight items.

The scale has ten items that measure a person’s desire to eat in response to “external” stimuli (non-hunger related), with an emphasis on exposure to the sights and smells of food.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a customer feels some control over the interaction with a salesperson by actively participating in a discussion of goods and/or services appropriate for his/her needs.

Five, seven-point items measure the degree to which an advertisement caused a person to think of happy events in his/her own life.

With five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s tendency to use the Internet for the purpose of avoiding unpleasant tasks and responsibilities.

The degree to which a person experiences negative emotions and thoughts for throwing away something in particular is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale may make most sense to use in contexts where the person is aware of alternatives for disposing of the item, particularly recycling. 

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s inclination to purchase a product from a particular store that will be given as a gift to a friend or family member.  As currently phrased, the scale makes the most sense for use with a hypothetical scenario.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person views self as an “outdoorsy” person and that affects his/her recreation as well as product choices.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a consumer likes buying a particular brand and is motivated to buy it frequently in the next few months.