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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

behavioral

Using four, nine-point items, the scale measures a person’s intention to engage in behaviors related to using sunscreen.

With three, seven-point items, this scale measures a consumer’s expressed probability of providing ideas and feedback to a particular business entity in the future.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure how much effort a person put into a particular task as well as how relevant it was.

Five, seven-point items measure how much cognitive effort a person put into reading some information.  

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s intention to say good things about a resort and encourage friends to go there. It appears the scale is easily adaptable for other places that involve lodging.

The scale uses eight, five-point items to measure a person’s reasons for using the Internet which have to do with boredom, relaxation, and communicating with others.

Using 13 Likert-type items and a 101-point response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person reports having one-way affiliation behavior and desires with a media celebrity. 

The degree to which a person is willing to make sacrifices for the long-term good of society as well as for other causes of personal importance is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items were used to measure how much a person notices and values the effort expended by a person or company to produce an object.  To be clear, the scale measures a general attitude about things that are made rather than being specific to a particular producer or product.

A person’s chronic motivation to critically evaluate alternatives in order to improve the quality of decisions that are made is measured with twelve, six-point Likert-type items.