You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

behavioral

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person still wants to eat a familiar brand of a product immediately after having tried some of an unknown brand. 

The scale measures a consumer’s belief that if he/she was wronged in some way by a brand and/or some employees associated with it then the memories of the unfair behavior would be an obsession.  Six, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Five, six-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person describes his/her faith (unspecified) as providing meaning to life and affecting aspects of how he/she lives. 

Three, nine-point Likert-type items measure a person’s stated likelihood of buying a particular product/brand from a particular retailer if he/she was in the market for the product.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses the desire to engage in behaviors that would damage a brand as well as stores and employees that sell the product.

A consumer’s belief that he/she does not have the ability to sway a brand and its employees toward his/her stance with regard to some issue or conflict is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses ten items to measure a person’s tendency to be engaged in what he/she is doing with undivided attention rather than being distracted such as with multi-tasking and mind-wandering.

Nine items are used to measure the tendency to accept one’s thoughts and feelings as they occur without evaluation or self-criticism.

A person’s tendency to express and verbalize his/her thoughts and feelings is measured with eight items.

The scale has ten items that measure a person’s desire to eat in response to “external” stimuli (non-hunger related), with an emphasis on exposure to the sights and smells of food.