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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

behavioral

This is a six-item, Likert-type scale that measures a person's tendency to use a product to its fullest and in numerous ways. The scale was referred to as multiple use potential by both Price and Ridgway (1983) and Childers (1986).

This is a nine-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's degree of interest in a variety of shopping-related activities. It was referred to as shopping enjoyment by Lumpkin (1985). See also Hawes and Lumpkin (1984) for a scale that combines two items from this measure with two from a clothing interest scale.

This is a four-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's interest in ads involving sales. It was referred to as advertising special shopper by Lumpkin (1985).

A four-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the degree of interest a consumer expresses in buying a product. The scale was used to study both calculators and typewriters. Due to its hypothetical phrasing, it is viewed here as more a measure of attitude toward the act of purchasing than purchase intention.

This is a two-item, six-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree of concern one expresses about his or her financial condition.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure store-related attitudes with an emphasis on the stated tendency to limit shopping to a few stores with which the respondent is familiar.

This is an eight-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring the number of times a customer indicates having been contacted by his/her agent in the previous two years. Crosby and Stephens (1987) used the scale with policy owners and asked them to respond with regard to their insurance agents.

This three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a person's stated tendency to try new brands. These items as a set have been called new brand tryer in several studies.

This 12-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reads ads, shops around, and gathers information apparently out of curiosity.