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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

behavioral

This four-item, six-point Likert-type scale appears to measure one's lack of self esteem due to poor health, loneliness, and/or physical immobility.

This five-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a person's desire to minimize the time spent on common activities and was referred to as time spent in everyday activities by Dickerson and Gentry (1983).

This is a six-item, Likert-type scale that measures a person's tendency to use a product to its fullest and in numerous ways. The scale was referred to as multiple use potential by both Price and Ridgway (1983) and Childers (1986).

This is a nine-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's degree of interest in a variety of shopping-related activities. It was referred to as shopping enjoyment by Lumpkin (1985). See also Hawes and Lumpkin (1984) for a scale that combines two items from this measure with two from a clothing interest scale.

This is a four-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's interest in ads involving sales. It was referred to as advertising special shopper by Lumpkin (1985).

A four-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the degree of interest a consumer expresses in buying a product. The scale was used to study both calculators and typewriters. Due to its hypothetical phrasing, it is viewed here as more a measure of attitude toward the act of purchasing than purchase intention.

This is a two-item, six-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree of concern one expresses about his or her financial condition.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure store-related attitudes with an emphasis on the stated tendency to limit shopping to a few stores with which the respondent is familiar.

This is an eight-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring the number of times a customer indicates having been contacted by his/her agent in the previous two years. Crosby and Stephens (1987) used the scale with policy owners and asked them to respond with regard to their insurance agents.

This three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a person's stated tendency to try new brands. These items as a set have been called new brand tryer in several studies.