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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

behavioral

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure a person’s commitment to buy one particular brand in a product category, even if it is more expensive than competing brands or not in stock.

A consumer’s general tendency across product categories to purchase the same brand over time and not switch to other brands is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, it is the tendency be loyal that is the same across categories rather than the brand.  If desired, instructions could be used to focus participants' attention more narrowly, such as on a particular category.

The extent to which a person relied on his/her emotions and intuition when evaluating an advertisement is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a customer complained to friends, family, and others about a particular shopping experience is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s intention to recommend something to others such as a service provider, retailer, website, or brand.

The subjective probability that a person will tell others about something is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.  The measure is “general” both in terms of what is being talked about as well as the favorability of the responder’s opinion (positive vs. negative).

The level of a person’s enjoyment of a celebrity and identification with him/her is measured with three, six-point Likert-type items.

Five unipolar items with a Likert-type response format measure the extent of effort and time invested by a consumer in a specific product assembling process.

The likelihood of engaging in certain loyalty-related activities are measured with this seven-point scale.  Versions with three, four, and six items are discussed.  While the scale might be adapted for use with a variety of businesses, it is most suited for hotels and restaurants.

The likelihood that a person will stop visiting one establishment of a type (e.g., bar, club) and begin regularly visiting another such establishment in the near future is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.