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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

beliefs

A customer’s beliefs regarding the anticipated quality of a company’s branded goods or services (before he/she has experienced the product) is measured with three, ten-point items.

Five, six-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person describes his/her faith (unspecified) as providing meaning to life and affecting aspects of how he/she lives. 

The degree to which a person believes the fundamental tenets of a religion, such as the reality of GOD, is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s belief about how favorably “other people” would think a group of people were portrayed in an ad.

The extent to which a person is superstitious is measured based his/her belief in three phenomena that, if genuine, would violate basic limiting principles of science.

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person views another person as having beliefs that are  consistent with his/her own.

The scale measures the degree to which a person holds beliefs consistent with a form of Christianity referred to as Evangelical.  The scale is composed of nine, nine-point Likert-type items.  Those scoring high on the scale would, for example, believe that their salvation is based on their acceptance of Jesus Christ as their savior rather than earning it with their own effort.

A three-item, seven-point summated rating scale is used to measure one's belief that a specified product attribute is possessed by the products sharing the same brand name (the family brand). The attributes studied by Loken and John (1993) were gentleness and quality.

A ten-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree of subtly degrading and derogatory opinions held by a person toward blacks in general. The items suggest that blacks are socially, morally, and/or educationally backward.

A three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the level of picture quality a consumer would like in a camera. The desire construct is supposed to be distinct from expectations because the former relates to beliefs about ''ideal'' product performance that lead to achievement of higher-level values whereas the latter are beliefs about performance benefits that will occur with a specified focal brand but may be short of what is ''ideal'' (Spreng and Olshavsky 1993, p. 172). Thus, desires imply higher standards than expectations.