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benefits

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure a person’s judgement of whether an advertisement emphasized benefits gained by the person taking an action or the losses and costs if the action was not taken. 

How much a person believes that, in general, companies should be engaged in philanthropic activities and that such behavior is beneficial to them is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The degree to which a consumer experiences satisfaction in buying products from a company because of its support of “good” causes is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Due to the phrasing of one of the items, the scale may make most sense when the company being evaluated is a retailer.

The scale measures a customer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the long-term, reciprocal contributions of both parties and benefits to those parties.  Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.

The extent to which a person believes there are benefits to a particular company having and using his/her personal data is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a customer’s belief that a particular deal he/she has negotiated with a business provides equal benefits for both parties.

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes, in general, that stress can enhance rather than debilitate his/her learning and productivity.

The scale has three, nine-point semantic differentials that measure how enduring and long-lasting a particular object is judged to be.  The scale appears to be most appropriate when used to describe physical objects (furniture, cars, electronics) rather than non-physical entities (emotions, faith, relationships).

"This Likert scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes that the benefit or value a consumer experiences with respect to a product is dependent upon the individual, i.e., some consumers enjoy more value from a product than others do.  Although the construct measured by this scale shares some similarity to the construct by the same name used in accounting, it is treated as an attitude in this scale rather than as a form of net present value.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes that using a particular good or service would be easier and allow greater flexibility than the currently used product.