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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

brand

With four, nine-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person’s belief that he/she has a clear idea of what a particular brand is about and where it is headed in terms of the types of products it will offer in the future.

Four, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a consumer would buy a brand again despite having had a bad experience with it.

The degree of compatibility a person believes he/she has with a “partner” regarding brand preferences is measured with three, seven-point items.

How well two brands are considered to be compatible and a good fit for co-branding a product or event is measured with three questions and a 101-point response scale.

The scale has three, nine-point items that measure a person’s stated likelihood of sharing good information about a brand to others he/she knows.

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.

A customer’s enjoyment of talking in various media about a particular brand is measured using four, five-point Likert-type items.

With four, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer provides feedback to a company about his/her experiences brand’s products in order to help improve them or have new ones created.  The implication in the sentences is that this behavior is ongoing rather than a one-time event.

Four, five-point Likert-type items measure a customer's attitude toward his/her current and future purchases of the brand.

The degree to which a customer promotes and refers a brand to friends and relatives because of monetary incentives from the company is measured with four, five-point Likert-type items.