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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

brand

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.

A customer’s enjoyment of talking in various media about a particular brand is measured using four, five-point Likert-type items.

With four, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer provides feedback to a company about his/her experiences brand’s products in order to help improve them or have new ones created.  The implication in the sentences is that this behavior is ongoing rather than a one-time event.

Four, five-point Likert-type items measure a customer's attitude toward his/her current and future purchases of the brand.

The degree to which a customer promotes and refers a brand to friends and relatives because of monetary incentives from the company is measured with four, five-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s belief that the price of a brand is reasonable and a good value is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

In this scale, four, seven-point semantic differentials evaluate how positive or negative a person’s attitude is toward a brand name.  A three-item version is also described.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a consumer believes that a set of brands they were exposed to seem to have been intentionally made to resemble each other.  While the sentences do not explicitly refer to the similarity of brands’ packaging or some other visual attribute, that is the implication.

The favorability of one brand compared to another is measured with three, nine-point questions. 

Three Likert-type items are used to measure the degree which a person believes the reason a brand sponsors something, such as a team, event, or charity, is because it is something that is expected by constituents, e.g., employees, customers, the community at large.