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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

budgeting

Six, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person believes he/she can stick to a budget, avoid spending when necessary, and accomplish financial goals.

A person’s likelihood of engaging in behaviors that could reduce his/her spending and save money is measured using eight, nine-point items.

Five, five-point items are used in this scale to measure how much a consumer considers trade-offs between his/her shopping goals given resource constraints and opportunity costs.

Seven, seven-point items are used to measure how much a consumer engaged in spending behaviors during a trip such as impulse buying and poor decision-making due to insufficient planning and not sticking to a budget.

The scale is composed of six, six-point Likert-type items that measure a person's preference for planning as well as the extent to which the individual develops goals and uses reminders of those goals.  As explained below, there are five versions of the scale, varying on what they focus.

The degree to which a consumer believes that it is typical for there to be insufficient funds to cover his or her needs is measured with three, five-point Likert-type statements.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer views his/her income to be barely sufficient to cover expenses.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a shopper has sufficient money to cover what is intended to be purchased as well as a few unplanned items during a particular shopping episode. The scale was called money available by Beatty and Ferrell (1998).

Three, five-point Likert-type items are purported to capture a person's attitude toward his or her own financial well-being.