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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

busyness

This four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the degree to which a person reports enjoyment of work in general and staying busy. This is not necessarily an indication of involvement or interest in a specific job.

This is a three-item, seven-point, Likert-type measure of the lack of time a person reports having given the things he/she generally has to do. The construct was referred to as costs of search by Srinivasan and Ratchford (1991) because of the reasoning that if a person is very busy, time for external search will be in short supply.

Several statements with a Likert-type response format are used to measure a person's lack of free time for him/herself each day. This was referred to as "My Time Oriented" by Lumpkin (1985).

The scale measures the degree to which a person expresses having time pressures due to the number of commitments and responsibilities in his/her life. The abbreviated version of the scale used by Reynolds and Beatty (1999b) was referred to as time poverty.

Three, five-point Likert-type items measure the lack of time a person perceives there to be available for doing what needs to be done in his or her life.

This five-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a person's desire to minimize the time spent on common activities and was referred to as time spent in everyday activities by Dickerson and Gentry (1983).