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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

capability

Four, seven-point Likert items are used to measure the degree of confidence a person has in his/her capability to learn a particular task and competently perform it.

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person is considered to be skillful and intelligent. 

The degree to which a person believes there is a possibility that a certain unjust situation can be remedied is measured using three statements.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that he/she is not capable of rectifying a particular problem and preventing it from re-occurring.  The implication is that the person is responsible for causing the problem.  The scale is called "low" here to distinguish it from a companion measure in the study by Duhachek, Agrawal, and Han (2012) that focused on "high" self-efficacy.

Three items compose this scale which measures a person's belief that he/she can help others by purchasing free trade products.

The degree to which a person believes that the purchase of free trade products ensures that producers will receive fair compensation is measured in this scale with three items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that he/she is capable of rectifying a particular problem and preventing it from re-occurring.  The implication is that the person is responsible for causing the problem.  The scale is called "high" to distinguish it from a companion measure in the research cited below that focused on "low" self-efficacy.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure how well a person believes that he/she is able to use the services of a business.

The three, seven-point semantic differentials that compose this scale are used to measure the extent to which a person describes a brand as being multi-functional and having greater benefits than the other brands.

A consumer's belief in his/her ability to evaluate a set of products and choose the best one is measured in this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.  The scale was called competence by Fuchs, Prandelli, and Schreier (2010).