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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

capability

Four, seven-point Likert items are used to measure the degree of confidence a person has in his/her capability to learn a particular task and competently perform it.

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person is considered to be skillful and intelligent. 

The degree to which a person believes there is a possibility that a certain unjust situation can be remedied is measured using three statements.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that he/she is not capable of rectifying a particular problem and preventing it from re-occurring.  The implication is that the person is responsible for causing the problem.  The scale is called "low" here to distinguish it from a companion measure in the study by Duhachek, Agrawal, and Han (2012) that focused on "high" self-efficacy.

Three items compose this scale which measures a person's belief that he/she can help others by purchasing free trade products.

The degree to which a person believes that the purchase of free trade products ensures that producers will receive fair compensation is measured in this scale with three items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that he/she is capable of rectifying a particular problem and preventing it from re-occurring.  The implication is that the person is responsible for causing the problem.  The scale is called "high" to distinguish it from a companion measure in the research cited below that focused on "low" self-efficacy.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure how well a person believes that he/she is able to use the services of a business.

The three, seven-point semantic differentials that compose this scale are used to measure the extent to which a person describes a brand as being multi-functional and having greater benefits than the other brands.

A consumer's belief in his/her ability to evaluate a set of products and choose the best one is measured in this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.  The scale was called competence by Fuchs, Prandelli, and Schreier (2010).