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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

change

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure how much a person changed his/her opinion of an object in order to maintain a good relationship with a particular person.

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure a person's belief in either the stability of body type (entity theory) or their ability to change basic body characteristics (incremental theory).  To be clear, beliefs about the nature of human bodies in general are measured by this scale rather than what people think about a particular person’s body.

A consumer’s belief that he/she does not have the ability to sway a brand and its employees toward his/her stance with regard to some issue or conflict is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how large a consumer considers a particular discount on a product’s normal price to be.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person redefined his/her role in a relationship due to some event.  The event is not stated in the items themselves but should be made clear to respondents in the context of the study or the instructions.

The scale is composed of five, six-point items that measure one’s expectation that if he/she were able to purchase a certain product then it would have a positive impact on one’s life in terms of confidence, status, and image.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s belief that his/her fate is not fixed but, instead, can be changed.

This three item scale measures a customer's belief that it is not worth changing from the type of checkout he/she has experience with at a store to another form of checkout.

Using five, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person's reluctance to engage in behaviors that appear to be risky.

With three, six-point Likert-type items, this scale is intended to measure a person's beliefs regarding the malleability of traits and attributes related to things in the world (self, others, and the environment).  At one extreme, some believe that the world is uncontrollable and fixed while at the other extreme there are people who view people and things as changeable and adaptive.