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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

change

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s attitude about the radical change a particular organization is about to make regarding what it stands for.  As currently phrased and scored, the items indicate the respondent is against the repositioning.  Also, the scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with a real event.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how large a consumer considers a particular discount on a product’s normal price to be.

How much change a person believes there to be in the market for a particular product category in terms of the products available, the promotion conducted, and consumer preferences is measured using four, seven-point items.

Six, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s desire to experience consistency and stability at the current time rather than change.

The extent to which a person believes in one’s ability to change the self is measured with four, six-point Likert-type items.

The belief that one can change his/her personal traits is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How familiar a consumer is with the improvements made in a brand over some specified time period and his/her approval of the changes is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The direction and relative amount that something is predicted to change is measured with three semantic differentials.  This very simple scale appears to be amenable for use in a wide variety of situations when paired with the proper instructions.

A customer's motivation to remain loyal to an organization even when there are reasons to switch to a competitor is measured using three Likert-type items.

The amount of perceived instability a person has experienced in his/her life during a certain period of time is measured in this scale using five, nine-point Likert-type items.