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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

character

The five item, nine-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that an advertisement uses a story-like format that communicates information about critical structural components such as who, what, where, and why. 

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes an object has a special intangible quality, something that can be viewed as its “essence” or “aura.”

A consumer’s belief that a particular product contains the legitimate and genuine character of a particular brand is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items. The scale could also be referred to as measuring “contagion” or “transferred essence.”

A person’s attribution of humanlike qualities to time (free will, emotions, intentions) is measured using six, seven-point items.

How much a person views time in a certain situation as being a beneficial entity or a maleficent force is measured with three, nine-point items.

A person's belief in either the stability of personality traits (entity theory) or their malleability (incremental theory) is measured in this scale using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, five-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a viewer believes there is a relationship between a character on a TV program and a product appearing in the program.

Nine, five-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a person is interested in, cares about, and sympathizes with a character on a television program. Russell and Stern (2006) referred to the scale as parasocial attachment.

The scale is composed of five point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a parent believes that being strict with children is the appropriate method for raising them.