You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

character

The five item, nine-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that an advertisement uses a story-like format that communicates information about critical structural components such as who, what, where, and why. 

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes an object has a special intangible quality, something that can be viewed as its “essence” or “aura.”

A consumer’s belief that a particular product contains the legitimate and genuine character of a particular brand is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items. The scale could also be referred to as measuring “contagion” or “transferred essence.”

A person’s attribution of humanlike qualities to time (free will, emotions, intentions) is measured using six, seven-point items.

How much a person views time in a certain situation as being a beneficial entity or a maleficent force is measured with three, nine-point items.

A person's belief in either the stability of personality traits (entity theory) or their malleability (incremental theory) is measured in this scale using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, five-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a viewer believes there is a relationship between a character on a TV program and a product appearing in the program.

Nine, five-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a person is interested in, cares about, and sympathizes with a character on a television program. Russell and Stern (2006) referred to the scale as parasocial attachment.

The scale is composed of five point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a parent believes that being strict with children is the appropriate method for raising them.