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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

charity

How much a person believes that, in general, companies should be engaged in philanthropic activities and that such behavior is beneficial to them is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

Five, seven-point uni-polar items are used to measure the kindness and effort a person believes were sincerely exhibited by a company with its contribution to a charitable event.  

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure the likelihood that a person will donate a product of his/hers that is not used anymore but could still be useful to someone else.

Three items are used to measure a person’s motivation to look for and gather items he/she owns that are not used anymore and could be donated.  The scale seems to make most sense to use when there has been an appeal of some sort that asked potential donors to think about things of theirs that could be given away.

Using three, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person believes one brand is closely related in some way to another brand.  In particular, the scale and its corresponding stem (question) were developed for use when comparing the fit between a brand associated with a product and a brand name associated with a charity.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person’s support of a particular organization is based on its community involvement and charitable activities.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular organization should be involved in charitable community activities and would stop supporting the organization if it discontinues such activity.

With six, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the apparent regulatory orientation of a charitable organization, ranging from a promotion focus to a prevention focus.

A person’s attitude about a particular object is measured using three questions with seven-point response formats.  The scale is general in that it could be used to evaluate organizations, people, or activities, among other things.  Further, the scale has more to do with one’s overall feeling rather than beliefs about specific attributes.

The scale measures the degree to which a consumer experiences conflict with regard to purchasing a discounted product linked with a charity.  The conflict is between personally benefitting by saving money and doing something purely to help the charity.  Three, eleven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.