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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

children

The scale is composed of six, five-point Likert-type statements that measure the extent to which a child indicates that his/her mother tells him/her what to buy or not buy. The tone of the items is that the child believes the parent is concerned about how the child's money is used and wants to have a lot of control over the decisions.

The scale has ten, five-point statements that are used to measure how a person reports being affected by various stressful events within his or her pre-adult life, particularly involving the respondent's family.

The seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the value a person places on having a family and spending time with them.

The scale is composed of twelve, nine-point semantic differentials assessing a person's stereotypic beliefs about teenage smokers.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type statements used to measure a person's attitude about banning the use of branded tobacco and liquor products in movies primarily due to the potential influence it could have on children.

The scale is composed of seven, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that parents should control what their children watch on television. In the studies by Walsh, Laczniak, and Carlson (1998; Carlson, Laczniak, and Walsh 2001) the scale was responded to by mothers but it appears to be amenable for use with other types of respondents as well.

Nine, four-point statements are used to measure how much a child believes his/her mother controls his/her TV viewing in various specific ways.

The scale is composed of five, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that there is a need for an organization, independent of parties involved in marketing products, to control television programming aimed at children. As one of the items indicates, the independent organization is envisioned as being composed of parents, educators, and broadcasters; government is not specifically mentioned.  A separate scale was developed by Walsh, Laczniak, and Carlson (1998) for that.

The scale is composed of nine, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that television broadcasters should be proactive in controlling the programming, including commercials, that are aimed at children.

The scale is composed of five, four-point statements measuring the frequency which a child believes that his/her mother makes statements that would indicate she has a negative attitude toward TV, with an emphasis on the inappropriateness of things kids may be exposed to.