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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

children

The probability that a parent would buy a product for a child on the condition that the child agrees to use his/her own money is measured using three, five-point items. The scale was referred to as child's payment by Rose (1999).

The scale is composed of three, five-point items measuring the probability that a parent would buy a product for a child when he/she asks for it. The scale was referred to as yielding by Rose (1999).

The scale is composed of several items using a four-point response scale to measure the degree to which a parent reports that a child exercises autonomy in the purchase of several products which the child will consume. Referred to by Carlson and Grossbart (1988) as consumption independence and consumption dependence by Rose (1999).

The scale is composed of five-point Likert-type items measuring the degree to which a parent reports that a child's opinion should be included when purchase decisions are made for a variety of goods and services for the family.

The scale is designed to measure the extent of parent-child interaction with regard to various aspects of shopping and spending money. If the scale is filled out by a child then the communication with parents is described whereas when a parent fills out the scale, communication with a specific child is described. The scale has been variously referred to as parental communication (Bush, Smith, and Martin 1999), family communication (Moschis and Moore 1984), and consumption interaction (Palan 1998).

The scale is composed of three, five point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person believes that a child should not learn to doubt his/her parent's views. It could also be viewed as a measure of parental ethnocentrism.

The scale is designed to measure a person's perception of the openness of the communication between a parent and a child. If the scale is filled out by a child then the communication with a specific parent is described whereas when a parent fills out the scale, communication with a specific child is described. The scale is composed of ten, five-point Likert-type statements.

The scale is composed of five point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a parent believes that being strict with children is the appropriate method for raising them.

The scale is composed of forced-choice items measuring the degree to which a parent expects unquestioning obedience and respect from his/her children.

The scale is designed to measure a person's perception of the problems involved in the communication between a parent and a child. If the scale is filled out by a child then the communication with a specific parent is described and when a parent fills out the scale, communication with a specific child is described. The scale is composed of ten, five-point Likert-type statements.