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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

children

The scale is designed to measure a person's perception of the problems involved in the communication between a parent and a child. If the scale is filled out by a child then the communication with a specific parent is described and when a parent fills out the scale, communication with a specific child is described. The scale is composed of ten, five-point Likert-type statements.

The scale is composed of statements measuring the degree to which a person, most likely a parent,  believes that a child should be shielded from discouraging and difficult situations. The statements are extreme enough that they might be viewed as reflecting over-protectedness on the part of those who agree with them. This scale was called fostering dependency by Schaefer and Bell (1958), Carlson and Grossbart (1988), and Rose (1999).

The scale is composed of three, five point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person believes that a child should not learn to doubt his/her parent's views. It could also be viewed as a measure of parental ethnocentrism.

The scale is designed to measure a person's perception of the openness of the communication between a parent and a child. If the scale is filled out by a child then the communication with a specific parent is described whereas when a parent fills out the scale, communication with a specific child is described. The scale is composed of ten, five-point Likert-type statements.

The scale is composed of five point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a parent believes that being strict with children is the appropriate method for raising them.

The scale has three, forced choice statements used to measure the degree to which a parent believes a child should obey school teachers and rules. This was referred to in some of the studies as values conformity.

The scale is composed of multiple five-point Likert-type items measuring the degree to which a parent describes the interaction with his/her children as being warm, affectionate, and encouraging.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a child's beliefs about various aspects of "proper" consumer behavior (paying bills, decision-making, purchasing) that have been communicated in some way by a parent. Two versions of the scale are presented (below). One has to do with the frequency with which these skills have been communicated by the parents. The other focuses on the degree of influence parent's opinions have had on the child.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point statements measuring preferences at the brand, store, and company levels that have been communicated in some way from a parent to a child. Two versions of the scale are presented (below). One has to do with the frequency with which these preferences have been communicated by the parents. The other focuses on the level of influence the parent's opinions have had on the child.

The scale is composed of six, five-point statements measuring how often a parent believes that a particular child of his/hers tries to do things without parental assistance.