You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

children

The scale is composed of statements measuring the degree to which a person, most likely a parent,  believes that a child should be shielded from discouraging and difficult situations. The statements are extreme enough that they might be viewed as reflecting over-protectedness on the part of those who agree with them. This scale was called fostering dependency by Schaefer and Bell (1958), Carlson and Grossbart (1988), and Rose (1999).

The scale has three, forced choice statements used to measure the degree to which a parent believes a child should obey school teachers and rules. This was referred to in some of the studies as values conformity.

The scale is composed of multiple five-point Likert-type items measuring the degree to which a parent describes the interaction with his/her children as being warm, affectionate, and encouraging.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point statements measuring preferences at the brand, store, and company levels that have been communicated in some way from a parent to a child. Two versions of the scale are presented (below). One has to do with the frequency with which these preferences have been communicated by the parents. The other focuses on the level of influence the parent's opinions have had on the child.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a child's beliefs about various aspects of "proper" consumer behavior (paying bills, decision-making, purchasing) that have been communicated in some way by a parent. Two versions of the scale are presented (below). One has to do with the frequency with which these skills have been communicated by the parents. The other focuses on the degree of influence parent's opinions have had on the child.

The scale is composed of six, five-point statements measuring how often a parent believes that a particular child of his/hers tries to do things without parental assistance.

The scale attempts to measure the degree to which a parent reports telling a child what to buy or not buy. This is in contrast to taking an interest in what the child wants to purchase and being lenient in allowing it.

The scale is composed of statements using a five-point response format that measure how often a parent encourages his/her children to form their own consumption preferences. The tone suggested in the items is of positive communication where the child's role, assistance, and opinion is respected rather than their purchases being dictated to them.

The scale measures what time during the week a parent reports typically watching TV with his/her children. The version by Carlson and Grossbart (1988) had an extra dimension intended to capture the importance of coviewing.

The scale is composed of seven, five-point statements designed to measure the degree to which a person is involved in activities that are typically considered to be wise or proper for consumers to engage in. Two of the items, #6 and #7, tap into conservation motivations or even environmentalism. As used by Palan (1998), the scale was completed by adolescents about their own behavior as well as by their parents who described the perceived degree of their child's activism.