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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

children

The scale is composed of statements using a five-point response format that measure how often a parent encourages his/her children to form their own consumption preferences. The tone suggested in the items is of positive communication where the child's role, assistance, and opinion is respected rather than their purchases being dictated to them.

The scale measures what time during the week a parent reports typically watching TV with his/her children. The version by Carlson and Grossbart (1988) had an extra dimension intended to capture the importance of coviewing.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person (a parent) believes that children should be free to candidly express their own views and disagreements with parents when they feel like it. This scale was called encouraging verbalization by Schaefer and Bell (1958).

The scale is composed of seven, five-point statements designed to measure the degree to which a person is involved in activities that are typically considered to be wise or proper for consumers to engage in. Two of the items, #6 and #7, tap into conservation motivations or even environmentalism. As used by Palan (1998), the scale was completed by adolescents about their own behavior as well as by their parents who described the perceived degree of their child's activism.

The scale is composed of three, five point Likert-type items measuring the degree to which a person (a parent) believes that it is best to leave children alone and not discuss their worries with them.

The scale is composed of three, four-point items that are intended to capture a child's tendency to respond to a brand in a consistently positive (or negative) way with the emphasis on the utility of the brand.

The scale is composed of four, four-point items that are intended to capture a child's tendency to respond to a brand in a consistently positive (or negative) way with the emphasis on the likeability of the brand.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person (adult) believes that the television programs aimed at kids are of high quality.

Four, four-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person has a positive attitude toward a specific television commercial to which he or she has been exposed. The commercial examined by Prasad and Smith (1994) was for a breakfast cereal aimed at children.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are purported to measure the degree to which a person subordinates individual goals to those of his or her parents.