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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

children

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are purported to measure the degree to which a person subordinates individual goals to those of his or her parents.

Five, four-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person has a positive attitude toward some specific brand of food product. The product examined by Prasad and Smith (1994) was a breakfast cereal aimed at children.

This is a two-item, five-point Likert-type summated ratings scale measuring the degree to which a person (a parent) believes that a child should be ''older'' before being allowed to take on certain responsibilities alone. It was referred to as Fostering Responsibility by Carlson and Grossbart (1988).

This five-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a parent reports buying several specific products for his/her child when the child asks for them.

An 11-item, five-point scale is used in measuring adolescents' expectations about their consumer roles once they start to work and raise a family. The role reflects things "good" consumers are supposed to do or not do.

A three-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a parent reports discussing the content of advertising with his/her child.

This is a four-item, forced-choice scale measuring the degree to which a parent believes a preschool child should take on some household responsibilities. It was referred to by Carlson and Grossbart (1988) as early maturity demands.