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Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

children

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are purported to measure the degree to which a person subordinates individual goals to those of his or her parents.

Five, four-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person has a positive attitude toward some specific brand of food product. The product examined by Prasad and Smith (1994) was a breakfast cereal aimed at children.

This is a two-item, five-point Likert-type summated ratings scale measuring the degree to which a person (a parent) believes that a child should be ''older'' before being allowed to take on certain responsibilities alone. It was referred to as Fostering Responsibility by Carlson and Grossbart (1988).

This five-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a parent reports buying several specific products for his/her child when the child asks for them.

An 11-item, five-point scale is used in measuring adolescents' expectations about their consumer roles once they start to work and raise a family. The role reflects things "good" consumers are supposed to do or not do.

A three-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a parent reports discussing the content of advertising with his/her child.

This is a four-item, forced-choice scale measuring the degree to which a parent believes a preschool child should take on some household responsibilities. It was referred to by Carlson and Grossbart (1988) as early maturity demands.