You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

children

The scale is composed of seven, five-point statements designed to measure the degree to which a person is involved in activities that are typically considered to be wise or proper for consumers to engage in. Two of the items, #6 and #7, tap into conservation motivations or even environmentalism. As used by Palan (1998), the scale was completed by adolescents about their own behavior as well as by their parents who described the perceived degree of their child's activism.

The scale is composed of three, five point Likert-type items measuring the degree to which a person (a parent) believes that it is best to leave children alone and not discuss their worries with them.

The scale is composed of three, four-point items that are intended to capture a child's tendency to respond to a brand in a consistently positive (or negative) way with the emphasis on the utility of the brand.

The scale is composed of four, four-point items that are intended to capture a child's tendency to respond to a brand in a consistently positive (or negative) way with the emphasis on the likeability of the brand.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person (adult) believes that the television programs aimed at kids are of high quality.

Four, four-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person has a positive attitude toward a specific television commercial to which he or she has been exposed. The commercial examined by Prasad and Smith (1994) was for a breakfast cereal aimed at children.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are purported to measure the degree to which a person subordinates individual goals to those of his or her parents.

Five, four-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person has a positive attitude toward some specific brand of food product. The product examined by Prasad and Smith (1994) was a breakfast cereal aimed at children.

This is a four-item, forced-choice scale measuring the degree to which a parent believes a preschool child should take on some household responsibilities. It was referred to by Carlson and Grossbart (1988) as early maturity demands.

This is a two-item, five-point Likert-type summated ratings scale measuring the degree to which a person (a parent) believes that a child should be ''older'' before being allowed to take on certain responsibilities alone. It was referred to as Fostering Responsibility by Carlson and Grossbart (1988).