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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

choice

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person feels that he/she might not be accepted by “others” (unspecified) because of a choice he/she made.

Five Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person experiences a feeling of well-being with respect to a particular choice he/she has made.  Two slightly different versions of the scale are provided: one that allows for comparison of two decision options and another version that focuses on just one option.

The degree of certainty a person has in the appropriateness of a particular choice in which one option was selected over another one (explicitly stated) is measured in this five-item Likert scale.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how difficult a person believes it would be for him/her to make a particular choice.

The favorability of one brand compared to another is measured with three, nine-point questions. 

The degree of difficulty a person expresses in choosing one brand from among several in a product category is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Using three, seven-point items, this scale measures how much a person feels uncertain about a choice he/she has made.

Three items are used to measure how much a person has a positive attitude toward a set of products and believes, as a whole, they are better than expected.  As implied by one of the items, the person will choose one product from the set.

The extent to which a customer believes that a store carries too many options within a product category of interest is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that a particular individual has the right to make his/her own purchase choices is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.