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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

choice

This scale is composed of six, seven-point items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that the speed with which a website reacts to user actions is fast.

The scale is used to measure a person's satisfaction with the process of making a selection from among a set of alternative brands. The scale may be used prior to the consumer's consumption/usage of the product and is intended to be distinct from the type of satisfaction that can be measured after consumption has occurred. The full version of the scale has six items whereas the abbreviated version has three.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure a person's motivation to pursue a limited option with greater determination than he/she otherwise would have.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person feels bad about switching from one service provider to another and wishes that he/she had remained with the previous provider.

This scale uses three items to measure the degree to which a person expresses an understanding of their product/brand preference and can explain it.  The scale was called understanding of preference by Kramer (2007).

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels in control of a choice and takes personal responsibility for the outcome.

This scale is composed of five, five-point Likert-type items that measure the importance a person places on a particular decision. The scale was called service importance by Tokman, Davis, and Lemon (2007) because they phrased the items to refer to the selection of a service provider.

This scale has four, nine-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that during a recent experience he/she was free to express his/her creativity.

One version of the scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a recent choice made by consumer was strongly influenced by feelings (affect). A very similar set of items measured the degree to which a choice was feature-based (cognitive). These two scales were referred to as the affective choice index and feature choice index, respectively, by Darke, Chattopadhyay, and Ashworth (2006).

The scale assesses the extent to which a consumer expresses an economic motivation in selecting stores such that stores are shopped at based on the prices and deals they have.