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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

choice

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that are used to measure the degree to which a person places emphasis on the process of making a decision because of the belief he/she is responsible for the procedure used to make the decision rather than the outcome.

The scale is composed of seven forced-choice statements assessing the preference a person has for one of two advertisements to which he/she has been exposed, both promoting the same product.

Three, five-point descriptors are used to measure the degree of importance a consumer places on some store attributes related to the convenience of shopping.  Given the directions, the importance of shopping convenience is focused on one or more product categories.

The scale is used to measure a person's satisfaction with a product after the selection/purchase has been made and probably after consumption/usage of the product has occurred. The context for the scale's usage was at the end of an experiment when subjects had made a selection between a variety of brands (Fitzsimons (2000; Huffman and Kahn 1998). The full version of the scale has six items whereas the abbreviated version has three.

The scale is composed of three, nine-point Likert-type statements intended to measure the degree to which a consumer believes a decision he/she has made regarding a service-related purchase was the right one. Due to the third item in the scale, the facility used to provide the service is an integral aspect of what is being measured.

Six, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the time and effort expended by a consumer in selecting a bank in which to open an account.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a customer views a service provider he/she uses and the image that the provider has as being important to his/her self-concept.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are purported to measure the likelihood that a consumer will choose a particular service provider the next time the service is needed.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure the importance of a product to a consumer in terms of the confidence (or lack thereof) the consumer has about making the right choice. This appears to be a measure of the uncertainty component of perceived risk but it has been viewed by its users as a form of involvement.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure the difficulty a person would have in making a purchase decision with regard to particular product category, with an emphasis on the extent to which the consumer would be personally disturbed about making a bad decision. Perhaps this means that the consumer thinks his/her pride would be damaged by making a poor choice. This appears to be a measure of the consequences component of perceived risk but it has been viewed by its users as a measure of a form of involvement.