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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

clothing

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how much a product appears to have been touched and is considered dirty. 

Four, nine-point uni-polar items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular pair of jeans is durable and well made.

The three-item, five-point scale measures the degree to which a person feels that engaging in one of two behaviors would be a signal of his/her status and superiority to others.

The extent to which a person views two brands as being similar in image and usable together is measured with four statements.  The scale was created for use with clothing brands and two of the statements will need to be rephrased if used with products other than clothing.

Seven, nine-point items are used in the scale to measure a person's beliefs regarding a pair of hiking boots.  The emphasis is on how well the boots are thought to perform on the listed characteristics.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which luxury brands are viewed as facilitating self-expression and helping to project a particular image in social settings.

A consumer’s pattern of acknowledging and defining needs/wants for clothing is measured using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The various versions of this Likert-type scale are used to measure the importance of being in fashion, particularly with regard to dress. A four-item version was suggested by Wells and Tigert (1971) and apparently used by Darden and Perreault (1976). Two-and four-item versions were used by Lumpkin and Darden (1982) and Wilkes (1992), respectively. See also the scale used by Schnaars and Schiffman (1984).

A four-item, six-point, Likert-type scale is used to measure a consumer's intention to buy American-made brands in a specified product category. The scale was referred to as willingness to help by Olsen, Granzin, and Biswas (1993). It is called something a little different here because the items emphasize the extra effort one tries to make to purchase domestically produced brands rather than explicitly measuring a person's willingness to buy American-made products in order to help American workers.

Four unipolar items are used to measure the degree to which a person has experienced a feeling of abhorrence because of a certain stimulus that is viewed as being physically dirty or unsanitary. In the studies conducted by Argo, Dahl, and Morales (2006), the stimulus that respondents reacted to was putting on a t-shirt that was perceived to be "contaminated" by being previously worn by one or more strangers. In the studies by Morales and Fitzsimons (2007) the participants were reacting to a package of cookies that had touched a package of feminine napkins.