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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

cognition

This 12-item scale measures a person’s awareness of alternatives, willingness to adapt, and confidence in his/her ability to behave effectively in a particular situation.

Three, five-point items measure how much a person believes a particular event or activity motivated him/her to think about forming relationships with other people.

How much a person believes a particular event or activity motivated him/her to think about maintaining long-term relationships with other people is measured with three, five-point items.

With four, five-point items, the Likert scale measures how actively a person thought about an object and, in particular, how useful he/she believed it could be.

The scale contains four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s use of self-categorization and conceptual overlap to consciously link his/her identity with the identity of a particular organization.

The general tendency to attribute distinct human mental capacities to nonhumans is measured with 15 questions.

With five, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person tends to process information such that it is conscious, intentional, analytic, and relatively affect free.

Four items with a seven-point response format are used to measure how much a person has been burdened by something that has happened to the point that it depletes his/her ability to deal with it.

The ease of comprehending a stimulus such as a message is measured in this scale with seven, seven-point semantic differentials.  The construct is sometimes referred to as fluency.

A person's judgment of the level of information he/she has had to process during some particular event is measured using three, five-point items.