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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

cognition

With four, five-point items, the Likert scale measures how actively a person thought about an object and, in particular, how useful he/she believed it could be.

The scale contains four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s use of self-categorization and conceptual overlap to consciously link his/her identity with the identity of a particular organization.

The general tendency to attribute distinct human mental capacities to nonhumans is measured with 15 questions.

With five, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person tends to process information such that it is conscious, intentional, analytic, and relatively affect free.

Four items with a seven-point response format are used to measure how much a person has been burdened by something that has happened to the point that it depletes his/her ability to deal with it.

The ease of comprehending a stimulus such as a message is measured in this scale with seven, seven-point semantic differentials.  The construct is sometimes referred to as fluency.

A person's judgment of the level of information he/she has had to process during some particular event is measured using three, five-point items.

One's chronic desire to make the optimal choice when making decisions is measured with four, nine-point items.  The construct attempting to be measured is the opposite of what is sometimes referred to as satisficing.

A person's enjoyment of puzzles as well as his/her belief that their usage can improve one's analytical ability is measured using three, eleven-point items.

The extent to which a person believes that he/she has completely finished making a decision about something that involved making a choice among alternatives is measured with seven, seven-point items.