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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

commitment

Four, five-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s degree of commitment and loyalty.  The scale is general in the sense that it can be easily adapted for use with a variety of business entities such as a company, brand, store, or website.

How much a person believes that a particular business is committed to environmentally friendly practices is measured in this scale with four, seven-point items.

A customer’s belief that something such as a particular brand or company is better than the alternatives and that he/she is loyal to it, is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person believes he/she can stick to a budget, avoid spending when necessary, and accomplish financial goals.

With three, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures how much a customer will return to receive service from a particular provider in the future.  The items are phrased hypothetically but a very slight change in wording can make the scale relevant for use with an actual business relationship.

The scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a company is genuinely trying to be environmentally responsible and not just acting that way to make more money.  A six-item version of the scale is provided as well as an eight-item version, both with seven-point response formats.

The degree to which a consumer is committed to a company and believes the company knows what he/she wants is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The five, nine-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person expresses satisfaction with his/her relationship with a person as a result of a gift that person has given.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a customer’s intention to purchase a specified good or service from the same specified business in the future as purchased from in the past.  Given the phrasing of the items, the scale might also be viewed as a measure of commitment or attitudinal loyalty.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure a person’s commitment to buy one particular brand in a product category, even if it is more expensive than competing brands or not in stock.