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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

communication

With four, five-point items, the scale measures an adolescent’s belief that his/her parents would care about he/she thought if they said some media content is unsuitable for children, e.g., there is too much violence in movies and video games.

Four, five-point items are used in this scale to measure an adolescent’s belief about what his/her parents would say if they did not want him/her to watch television, movies, or video games that contained too much violence.  Specifically, this belief is a characterized by the parents “restricting” the time the child spends with the unacceptable media content and providing rationale in which the perspective of the adolescent is taken seriously.

The degree to which a person believes that a game has effectively communicated information about a particular featured product is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.   

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes another person is like him/her in terms of communication style, with an emphasis on nonverbal expression.

The extent to which a customer believes a particular service provider expresses genuine interest in him/her and encourages communication is measured with four items.

A consumer's attitude about the informativeness and believability of communications from a company is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the communication activities referred to in the scale items can refer to advertising, the phrasing is broad enough to include those of a PR nature as well such as press releases.

The degree of difficulty a person reports having when writing about a particular experience he/she has had is measured using four, nine-point Likert-type items. 

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a parent believes that he/she along with other parents should be open to children's opinions and encourage them to speak up.

How much a person believes a particular message is worded normally rather than being phrased in an unusual way is measured using three items. Although Kronrod, Grinstein, and Wathieu (2012) used the scale with respect to an ad-type message, the items are amenable for use with other types of messages. 

How confident a person is that he/she is able to speak with members of the opposite gender and initiate flirtatious conversations with them is measured in this scale with seven items.