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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

company

The clarity with which a person understands what a particular company does with the data it has on its customers is measured with four, seven-point semantic-differentials.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person has confidence in the reliability with which a company handles the customer data in its possession.

The scale has three, seven-point items which measure a person’s disbelief that a particular company is one of the worst ones in its industry as reported by a major consumer organization.  The scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with an actual event.

With three, nine-point items, the scale is intended to measure a person’s opinion about how willing a company would be to listen to a customer’s request and agree to it.  The underlying tone of the sentences, which can be made more explicit by the study’s context, is that the request is unusual or against the rules.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing in such a way that it enriched one’s social value.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing such that it negatively affected one’s social value.

How much a person believes that a particular business is committed to environmentally friendly practices is measured in this scale with four, seven-point items.

Five, seven-point uni-polar items are used to measure the kindness and effort a person believes were sincerely exhibited by a company with its contribution to a charitable event.  

The degree to which a consumer experiences satisfaction in buying products from a company because of its support of “good” causes is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Due to the phrasing of one of the items, the scale may make most sense when the company being evaluated is a retailer.