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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

comparison

How much a person believes that he/she is less honest about personal finances in a current marriage (or committed romantic relationship) compared to a previous one is measured with three, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person believes that he/she has benefitted more from a transaction than the other party in the exchange is measured with three, seven-point Likert items. 

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person thinks that a particular other person knows a brand better than other consumers and could be considered an expert. 

A person’s desire in a recent decision to compare options before making a choice is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three semantic differentials, the scale measures how much a person believes a group of people are like him/her, especially in the way they think.  While it is possible for the comparison to be with other people in general, it is more likely that the scale will be used to measure how much individuals believe themselves to be similar to people in a particular group.

The extent of similarity a person believes there to be between him/herself and someone else in terms of cognitive and physical characteristics is measured with four, seven-point items.    

This seven-point scale measures how much a consumer believes one smartphone is similar to another phone on four characteristics related to ease of use.

The belief that someone put more thought and time into writing a review than the average reviewer is measured with six items.  The object of the review is not stated in the sentences but can be put in the instructions if not obvious from other aspects of the experiment or questionnaire.

The extent to which a person believes another individual is a peer and thinks like him/her is measured with three, 101-point items.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that a particular good or service is new to the market and different from alternative products.