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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

comparison

The degree of certainty a person has in the appropriateness of a particular choice in which one option was selected over another one (explicitly stated) is measured in this five-item Likert scale.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure whether information about the stock level or the sales level of two comparable products is the better indicator for making a purchase decision.

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.

With four Likert-type statements, the scale measures how easy a consumer believes it was to compare the healthiness of some similar products by using the information available on their packages.

How new and surprising a product development process is believed to be is measured using four, seven-point items.  The statements composing the scale are flexible enough to be used when comparing two products or when assessing just one product, but the response formats would need to be different.

Three, seven-point items measure a consumer’s comparison between two uses of a product in terms of which application is believed to be the better.  To be clear, as stated, the items focus on the applications of the product rather than to the product itself.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure which of two objects a person considers to be more valuable and preferable to own. 

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes another person is like him/her in terms of communication style, with an emphasis on nonverbal expression.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how lonely a person reports feeling at a point in time, especially as compared to “other people.”

How similar a person believes he/she is compared to another person is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.