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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

comparison

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.

With four Likert-type statements, the scale measures how easy a consumer believes it was to compare the healthiness of some similar products by using the information available on their packages.

The degree of certainty a person has in the appropriateness of a particular choice in which one option was selected over another one (explicitly stated) is measured in this five-item Likert scale.

How new and surprising a product development process is believed to be is measured using four, seven-point items.  The statements composing the scale are flexible enough to be used when comparing two products or when assessing just one product, but the response formats would need to be different.

Three, seven-point items measure a consumer’s comparison between two uses of a product in terms of which application is believed to be the better.  To be clear, as stated, the items focus on the applications of the product rather than to the product itself.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure which of two objects a person considers to be more valuable and preferable to own. 

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes another person is like him/her in terms of communication style, with an emphasis on nonverbal expression.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how lonely a person reports feeling at a point in time, especially as compared to “other people.”

How similar a person believes he/she is compared to another person is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a store offers good quality that is better than the competing stores.