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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

comparison

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes another person is like him/her in terms of communication style, with an emphasis on nonverbal expression.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how lonely a person reports feeling at a point in time, especially as compared to “other people.”

How similar a person believes he/she is compared to another person is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a store offers good quality that is better than the competing stores.

The scale uses three, ten-point questions to measure the degree to which a person thought about how he/she looked compared to a particular person with whom he/she interacted. 

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure to what degree one person considers another person to be similar to him/herself, particularly in terms of behavior.

One’s attitude about which of the two genders is needier and requires more care is measured with three, nine-point items.  The questions are phrased in terms of “boys” and “girls.”

Eight, nine-point items are used to measure how much a consumer thinks that a price listed for a certain product is the actual price that will be charged by a particular retailer.

Three, nine-point semantic differentials along with a scale stem measure a person’s attitude about a focal brand compared to a referent brand within a stated product category.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a person’s unease and displeasure that a group he/she belongs to is inferior to other such groups and is not performing as well.  The criteria on which the groups are being compared are not explicitly identified in the items and can be specified in the questionnaire.