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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

comparison

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a consumer's belief that products purchased at a certain store are cheaper than found at other stores, particularly for those products that are advertised.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure a person's ability to recognize so-called "green products" and distinguish them from products that are not "green."

Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure the functional utility of a particular brand in a particular product category.

This scale uses four, nine-point semantic differentials to measure a customer's attitude regarding the fairness of his/her treatment in a purchase transaction compared to what other customers were thought to have received.  The emphasis is on the quality of the deal received relative to what other customers got.

Three, six-point Likert-type items measure a person's belief that a product that is shared with others is just as good as one that is personally owned.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a consumer's subjective knowledge of the prices charged by stores for similar products and an understanding of their various price-related specials. 

The extent to which a person reports feeling similar to a certain other individual is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure whether a consumer prefers to receive one particular sales promotion offer rather than another.  The scale is structured for the choice to be made between just two different offers rather than several alternatives.

The tendency to compare one's self to others is measured in this scale with eleven, five-point Likert-type items.

The perceived size of a person's body is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the description is relative in that the body being described is compared to another body such as the respondent's.