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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

comparison

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer is familiar with the quality of other service providers and has, in fact, tried some other providers over time. This scale was called alternative experience by Burnham, Frels, and Mahajan (2003) to distinguish it from the other scale of switching experience they used. That one appears to tap into the same construct as this one except that it emphasizes the quantity of switching a bit more, especially in the last two years.

The scale is composed of four, five-point items intended to measure the perceived potential "costs" of changing service providers that have to do with the time and effort needed to search for information regarding alternative providers and analyzing that information in order to make a decision.

Four, seven-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular store provides sufficient information about a product category so that a decision can be made of what/where to buy.

The scale assesses the extent to which a consumer expresses an economic motivation in selecting stores such that stores are shopped at based on the prices and deals they have.

The scale has four Likert-type items that measure the ease with which products can be located in a store along with information to help in the selection. Seiders et al. (2005) referred to the scale as benefit convenience.

The four, five-point Likert-type statements measure the degree to which a person believes the services provided by competing providers in an industry vary a lot in their quality. If reversed from the way the items are shown being scored (below), the scale could be considered a measure of parity.

The scale is composed of four, five-point items that measure the level of general satisfaction a consumer expresses towards a service provider, with an emphasis on how well the service provider is viewed compared to the ideal provider.

Three, ten-point semantic differentials are used to measure the level of general satisfaction a customer has with a certain service provider. The scale appears to combine aspects of disconfirmation with a comparison to the "ideal" provider.

The scale is composed of five statements that are intended to measure a person's satisfaction with the search process for a certain product recently conducted at a website.

Three, seven-point statements are used to measure a consumer's beliefs regarding the inclination of other customers to want a refund from a store if they find a product they bought there to be cheaper elsewhere.