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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

competence

The motivation a person has to feel talented and able to perform well is measured with four, seven-point items.

How much something is believed to be characterized by traits such as skillfulness, confidence, and intelligence is measured with seven-point uni-polar items.  A six- and a three-item version are described.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

Four, seven-point Likert items are used to measure the degree of confidence a person has in his/her capability to learn a particular task and competently perform it.

This five-item, seven-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that his/her self-worth is based on performing better than others on a task or skill.

The scale has six items that are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson is competent and has high integrity.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure one’s self-efficacy with regard to accomplishing goals in life despite obstacles.

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person is considered to be skillful and intelligent. 

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person is viewed as competent and ambitious.

Using six, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that an organization to which he/she belongs is competent and caring about its members.

The degree to which one person views another person as being competent due his/her assertiveness and apparent status is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.