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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

competition

The scale is composed of five, five-point items measuring a consumer's sense of the general price level of a focal supermarket's products in comparison to those of other stores.

Three, semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that the information to which he/she has been exposed describes a product and its features in a positive manner and indicates it is better than the competition. The scale was referred to as an information valence index by Ahluwalia and Gürhan-Canli (2000) and description index by Gürhan-Canli and Maheswaran (2000b).

Four seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes there are acceptable alternative sources of a product. Although the scale was developed for use with a service provider it would appear to be amenable for use with sellers of physical goods as well. The measure was called attractiveness of alternatives by Jones, Mothersbaugh, and Beatty (2000).

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that prices charged by the grocery stores in the local area (city, town) vary considerably.

Thirteen, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a consumer believes that prices for different brands of the same product vary a lot within grocery stores as well as across stores.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are purported to measure the degree to which a person believes the security of his or her livelihood or that of a friend is threatened by foreign competitors.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are purported to measure the degree to which a person believes the security of the domestic economy in his or her country is threatened by foreign competitors.

This five-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure consumer attitudes about prices in general. A seven-item version of the scale with similar psychometric properties is also discussed below.