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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

concern

How much a person views him/herself as sympathetic and concerned about others is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With four items and a seven-point Likert-type response format, the scale measures the degree of concern a person has about tipping at a particular service-related retail establishment.  The scale is flexible for use in a variety of contexts in which tipping is relevant. 

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that the sponsor of an event truly cares about it and thinks it deserves support.

The scale measures how much an organization is believed to be selfish and motivated by its own self-interest.  Two versions of the scale are presented and vary in terms of whether one organization is being described or if two organizations are being compared.  Most of the studies used the same eight items.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert items to measure the degree to which the feedback provided by a customer to a service provider is meant to show concern for the future of their relationship.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular company is socially active due to its genuine concern and unselfish motivation.

A Likert-type scale with five statements measure the degree to which a person believes that ecological crises are likely to occur because of harmful human activity.

The degree to which a person believes that a particular organization cares about its customers and is helpful is measured with this five-point scale.  A two and a four item version are discussed.  While the scale was made for use in the hospitality industry, it could be easily used with many other businesses as well.  With a minor change in one of the items, the scale could be used with non-businesses as well.

The level of care, concern, and helpfulness exhibited by a company to its customers is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, 10 point questions, this scale measures the degree to which a person thought about how he/she was being evaluated by a particular person with whom he/she had interacted.  In this case, “evaluation” is meant more in the sense of being “sized-up” or judged rather than formal testing or professional diagnosis.