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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

concern

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person is bothered that a company is able to track him/her and may also misuse the information being collected.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s concern about privacy when using the internet, with the emphasis on the misuse of information that has been submitted.

Four, eight-point items measure the importance a person places on protecting the ecosystem and living in harmony with it.

The three item, seven-point scale measures the extent to which a person is in a state of indifference and lacks any particular emotion at that point in time.

The seven, seven-point items in this scale are intended to measure a person’s self-consciousness regarding the way he/she looks and the desire to look good to others.  

With seven, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s self-consciousness regarding the way a reference group of his/hers looks to others, particularly with respect to the area where the group members live.  

The scale uses five, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief that those close to him/her promote equality by helping the less fortunate.

A person’s concern for people in need and the importance placed on personally helping them is measured with five, seven-point items.

How much compassion a person feels for others is measured with seven-point unipolar items.  With the proper instructions, this version seems to be adaptable for use in a wide variety of situations.  Versions with five, six, and seven items are described.

Using three semantic differentials, the scale measures the degree to which something is viewed as caring and unselfish.  The items are most suited for describing a person but might in some contexts be applied to an entity such as a business, charity, or government.