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concern

Fourteen, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a customer's attitude regarding the degree to which a store values one's business and cares about one's well-being.

Ten, five-point items are used to measure the quality of service perceived to be provided by a particular organization as it pertains to employee-related activities and customer interactions.

Four items and a nine-point response format are used to measure the level of caring and attention a person thinks a company exhibits toward its customers, particularly through its employees, compared with the desired level (the performance level the company can and should deliver).

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that are used to measure the degree to which a customer perceives a salesperson was truly listening to him/her based on the responses the salesperson made.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the degree to which a customer believes a salesperson was paying close attention to verbal and nonverbal cues he or she was sending during the sales encounter.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that a salesperson was listening to him/her, trying to understand his/her needs, and asked for more information when necessary.

The scale uses four, seven-point statements with a Likert-type response format to measure the perceived courtesy and respect a customer is given when resolving a conflict with a retailer.

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer perceives a salesperson to have greater interest in self than in the customer. Williams and Spiro (1985) viewed this scale as measuring the self-oriented dimension of customer communication style, which stresses a lack of empathy and interest in self more than others.