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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

congruence

How well a decision-maker believes the recommendation of another person matched his/her own is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the object being recommended is evaluated more with subjective criteria than objective.   

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person identifies with a particular message and believes it expresses something to others about him/herself.

How much a person identifies with the information in a particular advertisement is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The link between two of one’s self-identities is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The particular identities referred to in the sentences are ideal and ought.  

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s tendency to view one’s choices and behavior to be a strong indication of his/her personality.

The extent to which a person believes another individual is a peer and thinks like him/her is measured with three, 101-point items.

The scale uses four Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer believes there is a uniform design of the brand across multiple touchpoints. 

Three, seven-point items measure the similarity between a consumer’s self-image and his/her idea of a “typical” user of a brand.

Three, seven-point items measure how much a consumer identifies with a brand and feels connected to it.

The compatibility of a brand and a cause-related organization having some sort of partnership is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.