You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

congruence

This three item, Likert-type scale measures how well a person believes the advertisement for a certain product is suited for that product. 

The extent to which a person, such as a viewer or consumer, believes that he/she is similar to the person who created a particular ad is measured using three, seven-point items.

The extent to which a person expresses his/her identity by watching a particular event is measured with three items.

The scale measures a person's belief that a particular brand extension has a legitimate connection with the original.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.  Three, seven-point Likert-type statements compose the scale.

This five item scale measures how much a consumer likes a brand and is glad to be seen with it.  Given the phrasing of the items, the scale makes the most sense to use when respondents are very familiar with the brand rather than it being new, proposed, or fictitious.

A person's belief that personalized advertising has benefits such as being treated as an individual and receiving relevant information is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a person reports feeling similar to a certain other individual is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

The three, seven-point semantic differentials composing this scale measure how well a person believes two things are consistent and coordinated with each other.

How well a person believes two things are compatible and consistent with each other is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

A person's inconsistent attitude toward an object is measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.  Chang (2011) used various versions of the scale to measure two constructs: ambivalence toward "green" products and ambivalence toward buying "green" products.